Thursday, December 13, 2012

Travel

Yesterday was all about family. Today, I'll tell you a little bit about the places I've visited. I've not traveled very much (yet):

USA and Canada: New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Maine, Florida, North Carolina, New Mexico, California, Niagara Falls, Toronto

And

Aruba

UPDATE #2: I think North Carolina was very interesting, for the food. I've had both really good food experiences there and really bad. The really good food was a vegetarian meal at, of all places, a traditional meaty BBQ. I had side dish after side dish and it was totally amazing.

The really bad food was at a wedding; they served us paper cups of kool-aid and dried out tiny cakes. Eeew.
Where have you traveled? What was the most interesting place you visited, and why?

UPDATE #1: A friend of mine who flies his own small plane shared this with me. I think this is a great way to see the world. He's flown as far north as Nashua, NH and Ra-ra-ra-Rochester, and as far south as Ocean City, MD. I wonder what Nashua, NH is like? According to Wikipedia it's the second largest city in the state.

"a Google Map that has a marker for every airport in my logbook. I've been other places, but I don't think getting to any of those was as much fun."





4 comments:

Nancy Torrente said...

I'm actually fairly well traveled. US states I've been to: AZ, CA, CT, DE, FL, GA, IL, LA, MD, MA, MS, NV, NH, NJ, NY, OH, PA, VA.

I've been to Canada (Niagara Falls, Toronto and Montreal)

I've also traveled to Germany with family.

I've been to Australia with student group called People to People right after I graduated high school.

And I've been to Egypt when I was working as an engineer.

Janet said...

That PtP group looks great! What was Egypt like?

Wire said...

I've been with you to a lot of places. Without you, I've been to Paris, Belgium (briefly), a few cities in Italy. I've driven from NY to AZ via MI and back, camping all along the way.

Thinking it over... I can't help but feel the most interesting place I've been is Manhattan. There is so much to see and do and eat and experience. I've been so many times, I even went to high-school there, and yet I never get tired of exploring that tiny island.

Heather said...

I've been to the below US states, not counting ones I've just passed through en route elsewhere: California (just San Francisco, multiple times), Colorado, Connecticut, Washington D.C., Florida, Georgia, Illinois (just Chicago, and I mostly only saw the U of Chicago campus), Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina (just Charleston), Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia.

In Canada I've been to Quebec, and to an island in the Thousand Islands in the St Lawrence, and bits of Nova Scotia. Also, Prince Edward Island.

I've been to Mexico but it hardly counts: only Cancun, with a side trip to Chichen Itza.

I've been to France (mostly Paris and only on a high school trip), Spain (also a high school trip - mostly Madrid and Barcelona), Italy (Venice), Scotland (Aberdeen, Edinburgh, Glasgow - all on a high school trip), and England (Cambridge and London).

I think the most interesting place I've been is probably NYC - like the above commenter said, it never gets old, even living here - though my fondness is for all 5 boroughs, not just Manhattan. Other than that, I love London, and I love San Francisco, but I can't tell how much of that is loving those particular cities more than other places vs. loving the particular travel experiences I've had there. In both places I've been either alone or almost-alone (with one other person, or by myself but meeting up with a few friends), which means that my travel experiences have basically been able to be full of things I love (good coffee, good food, bookshops, really long walks) and not full of things I don't love (cars, super-touristy stuff, chain restaurants, shopping for things other than books). I guess it's probably a bit of both: I mean, both London and SF *have* good food and good coffee and are walkable cities in a way that, say, Atlanta just isn't.